Circle K on Poole Road May Be Open 24 Hours a Day

Print More

Editor’s note: A previous version of this article stated the goal of Z-10-15 was to build a Circle K on Poole Road. The building is already under construction; the rezoning case would allow the store to remain open 24 hours. 

Planning Commissioners met Tuesday to hear numerous rezoning cases and a site plan case that would see a new Union Bank built on Strickland Road.

The Union Bank case, SP-48-14, focused on the lack of trees in the proposal, the lack of a 50-foot natural protective yard along Strickland Road and the need for enhanced stormwater management.

Site plan drawings for Union Bank

City of Raleigh

Site plan drawings for Union Bank

Tucker McKenzie, a designer with the local engineering firm Withers and Ravenel, spoke during the public hearing about the need to create a “dry pond,” which would be used to gather stormwater when it rained. It was decided in the meeting that trees and shrubs would be planted along the northeast border of the property. The case was recommended for approval by the commission.

Z-41-14, which involved the rezoning of 20 acres in a soon-to-be-annexed part of Wake County, was recommended for approval. The rezoning increased residential density and was found to be consistent with the comprehensive plan and future land use map.

While there had been no outstanding issues, staff reported that a statutory protest petition had originally been filed but was considered invalid because this was a first-time rezoning case. Michael Birch, representing the applicant, said that the petition had been filed in September 2014, months before negotiations with the neighbors had taken place.

The soon-to-be annexed part of Wake Coutny is highlighted on this map

Google Maps

The soon-to-be annexed part of Wake Coutny is highlighted on this map

Part of the negotiations with the neighbors, Birch said, had led to the undisturbed areas along the northwest side of the property and a plan to add tree conservation as part of the subdivision. He noted there were multiple access points at the north and south to disperse traffic and the goal of the case was to reduce average lot sizes for the aggregate.

Z-10-15, which involved the rezoning of a 3-acre parcel on Poole Road, was deferred. The company wanted to keep the Circle K, which is currently under construction, open 24-hours to be of service to patients arriving and departing from the nearby WakeMed hospital, adding that doing so would better keep it from being vandalized.

In the public hearing, neighbors of the property raised questions about the safety of keeping the Circle K open at all hours, citing cases where nearby businesses had been robbed during the late hours of the night. Planning commission members wanted to see the research saying it would be a safer practice to keep the Circle K open.

The site on which a Circle K might be built

Wake County

The site on which a Circle K is now being built

Z-8-15, which involved the rezoning of a property in the airport overlay district, was recommended for approval. The proposed rezoning aims to remove the airport overlay district designation, which would lead to increased residential density.

Micheal Birch, representing the applicant, reported that a presentation had been made to the northwest citizens advisory council (CAC) but no vote had been taken on it. He said he had proposed to the members at the CAC meeting that they could vote on May 12, before a city council public hearing, so the information would be available to be councilors.

3 thoughts on “Circle K on Poole Road May Be Open 24 Hours a Day

  1. Somehow I missed the news of the Circle K on Poole Road near me until the sign went up! Whoa!

  2. “Z-10-15, which involved the rezoning of a 3-acre parcel on Poole Road, was deferred. The goal of the rezoning was to allow for the building of a Circle K on the property. The company wanted to keep the Circle K open 24-hours”

    Sorry, but the Circle K has already been under construction for many, many weeks now. This zoning could not possibly have been related to “allow for the building of a Circle K on the property” since that has been in progress for quite a while. Whassamatta, Raleigh Public Record, afraid to actually come out to SE Raleigh, LOL? If you weren’t, then maybe you would also report on the nearby McDonalds at 3424 Poole Rd, which closed at end of April for “remodeling” and has now been totally demolished for reconstruction. Hint…the McDonalds sign said, “See you in July”. But I guess they won’t be seeing anyone from Raleigh Public Record here in the neighborhood. You just don’t care at all.

  3. Jay,

    You’re correct that the rezoning was for the store to be open 24-hours, not for the store to be built. I apologize for the error. As you said, construction has been under way for a while, permits were issued in January.

    However, we did report on the Poole Road McDonald’s here: http://goo.gl/7LnauI (scroll down to Tuesday & Wednesday for it).

    Edit: Regarding your comments regarding coverage of SE Raleigh – there’s no easy way to respond to that without sounding defensive. So I’ll say this – I agree that there are many parts of the city that are greatly under-served by the news media in general. These areas are generally what city officials will refer to as “low-wealth communities.”

    As a nonprofit, the Raleigh Public Record exists to serve the community, and a big part of our mission is to cover the stories that you don’t see on TV or read in the News & Observer. Unfortunately, our resources are pretty limited right now in terms of how much we can cover, but I would like to mention some of the coverage I’ve done of SE Raleigh:
    Business Incubator Articles: 1, 2, 3, 4
    Coverage of CAC Meetings in that area: 1, 2, 3,
    Articles Spawned from CAC Meetings in that area: 1, 2

    That being said, I welcome any and all suggestions you have for how we could improve our coverage of Southeast Raleigh (and beyond).

    Thanks,

    James